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Grace Swetnam

To document Grace Swetnam’s role in establishing the first public library in Jemez Springs, her son and Jemez Valley resident, Tom Swetnam provided a couple of newspaper clippings, which have been transcribed below.

From News of Northern New Mexico, Friday, April 2, 1965

The photograph above was taken in about 1965 inside the Presbyterian Church in Jemez Springs, where the original library was located before moving to a “donated” room in the Jemez Mountains Electric Coop building. Patricia Evilsizer (assistant librarian) stands next to Grace Swetnam, seated. Jim Swetnam is at the table in the foreground. In addition to Patricia, Lupe Casaus also served volunteered as an assistant librarian.

The photograph above was taken in about 1965 inside the Presbyterian Church in Jemez Springs, where the original library was located before moving to a “donated” room in the Jemez Mountains Electric Coop building. Patricia Evilsizer (assistant librarian) stands next to Grace Swetnam, seated. Jim Swetnam is at the table in the foreground. In addition to Patricia, Lupe Casaus also served volunteered as an assistant librarian.

 

Open House Set For New Library

JEMEZ SPRINGS – An open house to celebrate the new community library in Jemez Springs will be Sunday from 2 to 5 p.m. The public is invited.

Books have been furnished by the New Mexico Library Extension Service with the help of Miss Virginia Real, Aztec librarian, Mrs. Fred Swetnam is the director of the library. It is temporarily housed in the Presbyterian Church.

Residents may apply for cards during the open house. After April 6, the Library will be open on Tuesdays and Thursdays from 3 to 6 p.m. until summer vacation begins. After that, it will be open from 12 noon to 5 p.m., Tuesdays and Thursdays. Volunteers will run the library, which is one of the Jemez Springs Community Projects.

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From The Farmington (N.M.) Daily Times, Sunday March 14, 1965

Bottle Collecting Popular With Bookmobile Patrons

Bottle Collecting has become a popular pastime for several patrons of the Northwest Regional Library bookmobile

The February report of the bookmobile’s travels, submitted by Librarian Virginia Reale, notes that books have been requested on bottle identification. The report said ghost and old mining towns are best places to look for old bottles.

It goes on to say that two of the oldest and most valuable bottles found near Fort Wingate are an opium bottle and a 100-year-old ink bottle.

A new stop will be initiated in Jemez Springs in April, the report said, as soon as a definite location has been decided upon. These arrangements are being taken care of by Mrs. Grace Swetnam and Mrs. Thomas Evilsizer, wife of Farmington’s San Juan Mental Health Clinic’s psychiatrist.

Mrs. Swetnam, the report continues, recently moved to Jemez Springs from Penasco, where she helped start a book collection. Penasco is in the region served by the Northern Regional Library, Espanola.

The bookmobile report contains a portion of accounts of happenings at the Navajo Brethren in Christ Mission Hospital where applesauce parties are scheduled periodically to utilize to best advantage the supply of apples donated by friends in Bloomfield and Aztec.

School children and staff spend the evening making applesauce and preparing peeled apples for freezing.

They also have had mending parties, corn parties, and, on one occasion — a necking party.

This one consisted of participants taking the meat from canned chicken necks to make broth for soups!

 

Grace Swetnam, along with Patricia Evilsizer and Josephine Shepard, started a public library in Jemez Springs in 1965. Grace was the wife of Fred Swetnam, who was the US Forest Service District Ranger at Jemez Springs from 1964 to I973. Grace was very active and involved with community efforts in Jemez Springs in the 1960s and early 1970s, and she was one of many Jemez Springs leaders during this era who started the famous Christmas season displays, 4th of July celebrations, and other events and public improvements.

To document Grace Swetnam’s role in establishing what was probably the first public library in Jemez Springs, and most likely the original holdings of the current Jemez Springs Community Library, her son and Jemez Valley resident, Tom Swetnam, provided a couple of newspaper clippings, which have been transcribed below.

Transcribed from News of Northern New Mexico, Friday, April 2, 1965

The photograph above was taken in about 1965 inside the Presbyterian Church in Jemez Springs, where the original library was located before moving to a “donated” room in the Jemez Mountains Electric Coop building. Patricia Evilsizer (assistant librarian) stands next to Grace Swetnam, seated. Jim Swetnam is at the table in the foreground. In addition to Patricia, Lupe Casaus also served volunteered as an assistant librarian.

The photograph above was taken in about 1965 inside the Presbyterian Church in Jemez Springs, where the original library was located before moving to a “donated” room in the Jemez Mountains Electric Coop building. Patricia Evilsizer (assistant librarian) stands next to Grace Swetnam, seated. Jim Swetnam is at the table in the foreground. In addition to Patricia, Lupe Casaus also served volunteered as an assistant librarian.

Open House Set For New Library

JEMEZ SPRINGS – An open house to celebrate the new community library in Jemez Springs will be Sunday from 2 to 5 p.m. The public is invited.

Books have been furnished by the New Mexico Library Extension Service with the help of Miss Virginia Real, Aztec librarian, Mrs. Fred Swetnam is the director of the library. It is temporarily housed in the Presbyterian Church.

Residents may apply for cards during the open house. After April 6, the Library will be open on Tuesdays and Thursdays from 3 to 6 p.m. until summer vacation begins. After that, it will be open from 12 noon to 5 p.m., Tuesdays and Thursdays. Volunteers will run the library, which is one of the Jemez Springs Community Projects.

***********

From The Farmington (N.M.) Daily Times, Sunday March 14, 1965

Bottle Collecting Popular With Bookmobile Patrons

Bottle Collecting has become a popular pastime for several patrons of the Northwest Regional Library bookmobile

The February report of the bookmobile’s travels, submitted by Librarian Virginia Reale, notes that books have been requested on bottle identification. The report said ghost and old mining towns are best places to look for old bottles.

It goes on to say that two of the oldest and most valuable bottles found near Fort Wingate are an opium bottle and a 100-year-old ink bottle.

A new stop will be initiated in Jemez Springs in April, the report said, as soon as a definite location has been decided upon. These arrangements are being taken care of by Mrs. Grace Swetnam and Mrs. Thomas Evilsizer, wife of Farmington’s San Juan Mental Health Clinic’s psychiatrist.

Mrs. Swetnam, the report continues, recently moved to Jemez Springs from Penasco, where she helped start a book collection. Penasco is in the region served by the Northern Regional Library, Espanola.

The bookmobile report contains a portion of accounts of happenings at the Navajo Brethren in Christ Mission Hospital where applesauce parties are scheduled periodically to utilize to best advantage the supply of apples donated by friends in Bloomfield and Aztec.

School children and staff spend the evening making applesauce and preparing peeled apples for freezing.

They also have had mending parties, corn parties, and, on one occasion — a necking party.

This one consisted of participants taking the meat from canned chicken necks to make broth for soups!